Everything is brighter with rainbows even a rainy day because that’s the perfect time to hope to see one! Whether you are looking for a pot of gold at the end or just love the way the colors combine, exploring rainbows through science and STEM activities is a great way to get started! Find a fun selection of simple to set up rainbow science experiments to try out all year long. Any time of the year is perfect for exploring rainbows!

RAINBOW SCIENCE EXPERIMENTS FOR YEAR-ROUND STEM

Rainbow science experiments and activities for kids STEM. Rainbow science activities include making slime, growing crystals, building rainbows, and erupting rainbows!

RAINBOWS FOR KIDS

Over the past year, we have explored both rainbow science experiments and rainbow-themed science experiments. The difference? We have studied how real rainbows form and how light science plays a role in creating rainbows.

However, young kids also just love fun, rainbow-themed science activities that also showcase simple science concepts such as reactions, polymers, liquid density and crystal growing.

Below we have included both kinds of rainbow science experiments.  But before you get into all the fun, read on to learn a bit of rainbow science.

RAINBOW SCIENCE

How is a rainbow made? A rainbow is formed when light passes through water droplets hanging in the atmosphere.  The water droplets break white sunlight into the seven colors of the visible spectrum.  You can only see a rainbow when the sun is behind you and the rain in front of you.

There are 7 colors in the rainbow; in order violet, indigo, blue, green, yellow, orange, red.

Make sure to look out for a rainbow next time it rains!  Now let’s try a rainbow science experiment or two!

Looking for easy to print activities, and inexpensive problem-based challenges? 

We have you covered…

—>>> FREE Rainbow Activities

Free Rainbow STEM Challenge Cards

RAINBOW SCIENCE EXPERIMENTS

Want to turn a rainbow science experiment into a rainbow science project? Check out our easy science fair project ideas!

1.  LIGHT SOURCES AND RAINBOWS 

2. RAINBOW CRYSTALS

Grow crystals using a classic crystal growing recipe with borax and pipe cleaners. This rainbow science activity really grows awesome crystals that are both sturdy and beautiful to look at. Create a science craft with our pipe cleaner rainbow your design!

3. ERUPTING RAINBOW SCIENCE EXPERIMENT

A classic reaction for simple chemistry and a mix of colors to create an erupting rainbow!

4. Walking Water Rainbow

5. BUILD LEGO RAINBOWS FOR A STEM CHALLENGE!

Explore symmetry and design with a rainbow LEGO building challenge.

6. WATER DENSITY RAINBOW SCIENCE EXPERIMENT

Super easy kitchen science using sugar, water, and food coloring. Explore the density of liquids to create a rainbow.

7. MAKE RAINBOW SLIME

Learn how to make the easiest slime ever and create a rainbow of colors!

8. RAINBOW FIZZING POTS

A leprechaun’s dream with a cool chemical reaction in mini black cauldrons!

9. RAINBOW WATER BEADS SCIENCE ACTIVITY

Explore water beads for an unusual science and sensory play activity. Make a rainbow and explore light too.

10. RAINBOW OOBLECK

Oobleck is an awesome science activity for exploring Non-newtonian fluids. Do you know what a Non-newtonian fluid is or how it works? Learn more through this hands-on activity that uses basic kitchen ingredients.

11. RAINBOW SOLUBILITY

Make this fun rainbow craft with a few simple materials and explore solubility in the process.

Looking for easy to print activities, and inexpensive problem-based challenges? 

We have you covered…

—>>> FREE Rainbow Activities

Free Rainbow STEM Challenge Cards 

ENJOY AWESOME RAINBOW SCIENCE EXPERIMENTS THIS YEAR!

Click on the link below or on the image for more fun science experiments for kids.

Science experiments and activities for kids

3 Comments

  1. I love using your projects with my grandson. I am now faced with distance learning for my students. I am a STEM teacher at an elementary school. A lot of your project lend themselves easily to distance learning. What is your position on using some of your projects in my Google Classroom? Please advise. Thank you.

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