The winter season is perfect for exploring science experiments and one that we have been enjoying a lot around here is growing salt crystals. With a little patience, this super simple kitchen science is easy to pull off! Our crystal snowflakes with science project is cool and doable for all ages!

HOW TO MAKE CRYSTAL SNOWFLAKES WITH SALT

Growing Salt Crystal Snowflakes  Winter Science and STEM

GROWING SALT CRYSTALS

Growing crystals snowflakes with salt for winter science is a great way to explore chemistry with a fun theme. We love growing crystals with borax but growing salt crystals is perfect for the younger kids.

Growing borax crystals needs to be more of an adult led experiment because of the powder chemical involved, but this simple salt crystal science experiment is awesome for little hands and perfect for the kitchen.

Make our crystal snowflakes and hang them in the windows. They attract the light and sparkle too!

Sparkling Salt Crystal Winter Science Activity

Growing salt crystals is all about being patient! Once you make the saturated solution, you have to wait it out. The crystals grow over time and it does take a few days. Your borax crystals will grow faster {24 hours}. These will take a few days.

You can even use our free printable science worksheets to keep tabs on your salt crystal growing project. Record data, research, and draw photos of the changes and results.

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE: Scientific Method For Kids

CRYSTAL SNOWFLAKES EXPERIMENT

Here’s what you will need to get started. You also want to make sure you have a clear area to set your tray or plate so that it is undisturbed. The water needs time to evaporate and you want to try and minimize the plate being moved or nudged!

YOU WILL NEED:

  • Table Salt
  • Water
  • Measuring cups and spoon
  • Paper & scissors
  • Tray or dish
  • Paper Towels

HOW TO MAKE CRYSTAL SNOWFLAKES

STEP 1:  MAKE PAPER SNOWFLAKES

You will need to cut paper snowflakes and it’s actually super easy.

I simply cut a circle out of paper, folded it in half to start. Then I keep folding it over itself until I had a sliver of a triangle.

Cutting the actual snowflake might be a better job for an adult, but kids can cut simple snowflakes with less folds in the paper. It can be tough to get scissors to cut through a ton of folds.

Make sure to talk about symmetry with snowflakes. It’s a great way to incorporate math into your science activity and come up with a STEM project for all ages.

Learn more about snowflakes here.

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STEP 2: MAKE A SALT SOLUTION

Start with hot water. I just let the tape water run really hot. You can boil the water as well.

Tablespoon by tablespoon we added salt until the water could not hold anymore. The hotter the water, the more salt you will be able to add. The goal is to add as much salt as the water will hold to make a saturated solution.

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STEP 3: WATCH THE CRYSTALS GROW

Place your paper snowflakes on a try or dish and pour just enough salt water to cover the snowflake. You may even see some salt left over in your container, that’s ok!

Set your tray aside and wait and watch!

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HOW DO SALT CRYSTALS FORM?

Growing these salt crystal snowflakes is all about chemistry! What is chemistry? The reaction or change that occurs between two substances such as the water and salt.

As the salt solution cools and the water evaporates the atoms {sodium and chlorine} are no longer separated by water molecules. They begin to bond together and then bond further forming the special cube shaped crystal for salt.

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If you want to do science at home, it doesn’t have to be difficult or expensive! Just open you cupboards and pull out the salt.

salt-crystal-snowflakes

Looking for easy to print activities, and inexpensive problem-based challenges? 

We have you covered…

Click below to get your quick and easy winter STEM challenges. 

MORE FUN WITH SNOWFLAKES

GROWING CRYSTAL SNOWFLAKES WITH SALT FOR WINTER SCIENCE

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