Combine some fun science and balloons with this easy to set up science experiment for kids. Can you blow up a balloon with soda? What happens when you add salt to soda? Grab a few simple ingredients from the kitchen and you have amazing chemistry for kids at your fingertips. 

BLOW UP A BALLOON WITH SODA

SODA BALLOONS

Blow up a balloon using only soda and salt. We love fizzing experiments and have been exploring chemistry for kindergarten, preschool, and elementary kids for almost 9 years now.

Our science experiments are designed with you, the parent or teacher, in mind!  Easy to set up, quick to do, most activities will take only 15 to 30 minutes to complete and are heaps of fun! 

Plus, our supplies lists usually contain only free or cheap materials you can source from home. Grab some soda and balloons, and see if you can blow up a balloon with a little chemistry!

Also, check out these other fun science experiments with soda…

SCIENCE EXPERIMENTS AT HOME

Science learning starts early, and you can be a part of that with setting up science at home with everyday materials. Or you can bring easy science experiments to a group of kids in the classroom!

We find a ton of value in cheap science activities and experiments. All our science experiments use inexpensive, everyday materials you can find at home or source from your local dollar store.

We even have a whole list of kitchen science experiments, using basic supplies you will have in your kitchen.

You can set up your science experiments as an activity focusing on exploration and discovery. Make sure to ask kids questions at each step, discuss what is happening and talk about the science behind it.

Alternatively, you can introduce the scientific method, get kids to record their observations, and make conclusions. Read more about the scientific method for kids to help you get started.

CLICK HERE TO GET YOUR FREE PRINTABLE SODA SCIENCE PROJECT!

SODA BALLOON EXPERIMENT

Put the scientific method into practice with this easy to set up science experiment. Extend the activity by changing one variable. For example; explore what happens if you add the same amount of salt to different types of soda.

WATCH THE SCIENCE VIDEO:

SUPPLIES:

  • 2 bottles of soda
  • 2 balloons
  • salt

EXPERIMENT SET UP:

STEP 1: Open a bottle of soda and quickly place a balloon over the opening. What happens?

STEP 2: Pour about a half teaspoon of salt into the other balloon.

STEP 3: Attach the salted balloon to the other soda, but without letting the salt fall into the bottle.

STEP 4: Once secure, lift the balloon, allowing the salt to fall into the soda.

What happens? What was the difference between the two bottles? How were they similar?

THE SCIENCE

The fizzy bubbles you can see in the soda are a gas called carbon dioxide. Unopened soda, has large amounts of carbon dioxide gas dissolved into the water at high pressure. This process of adding the fizz to soda is called carbonation.

Normally, you can find these gas bubbles coming out of the soda on the sides of the bottle, which is why it becomes flat after a while.

When you open the bottle of soda, the bubbles have room to escape. The balloon grows in size because the carbon dioxide gas is filling it!

What about the second balloon? You would have noticed that when you add salt to the soda, you get a lot of fizzing and foaming happening! Also, the balloon blows up more quickly and bigger than the first balloon. This is similar to our Mentos and Coke eruption!

You might be surprised to know that what you are observing is actually a physical reaction, not a chemical reaction like baking soda and vinegar

Adding salt to soda speeds up the process of dissolved carbon dioxide gas forming bubbles and escaping into the air. This is because more bubbles can form on the surface of the salt crystals, which pushes the liquid up.

Salt in soda is a great example of a change of states of matter, the carbon dioxide dissolved in the liquid soda moves to a gaseous state.

FUN BALLOON EXPERIMENT WITH SODA AND SALT

We love exploring simple chemistry you can do at home or in the classroom that isn’t too crazy, but is still lots of fun for kids! Make sure to check out more fun chemistry experiments!

Chemistry Activities